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Pokémon BATTLING MECHANICS - A MUST READ!

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EspeonDude_ Posted at: 18:00 Nov20 2006 Post ID: 1158413
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These are some of the best things within the game. The guide covers nearly all the Game Mechanics in the game we all know as Pokémon. I'll be covering guides from Serebii.net to teach you all about the advanced mechanics of Pokémon! The most experienced players know about this, so prepare to learn all about the stuff the pros know, the people you may look up to! Enjoy the guide!:

STAB (Same Type Attack Bonus):

Crap, this is the easiest mechanic you'll need to learn in the game, and it isn't that hard to figure out either. If your move that you use matches the type of your Pokémon, it gets a bonus. The move power is multiplied by 1.5. So let's say you're using a Torchic and it uses Ember. Ember's base power is 40. So, multiply that by 1.5. 40(1.5) = 60. So now your Torchic is using a 60/100 Powered ember instead of 40. Do that with all the other moves and you'll be dealing a LOT of damage.

Hidden Power:

This really is a hard thing to determine. Determining what power it is, is pretty hard enough as it is. Thanks to cyber_john3000 for asking if there's an easier way. There happens to be a way to get the TYPE, not the Power, that's a lot of work, but to get the type, get a Kecleon, and your pokemon that knows Hidden Power. Just find a double battle and use Kecleon and use Hidden Power on it. Color Change will determine your type.

A guide from Serebii.net will be used here. I give Serebii FULL credit for this, so dont say I stole it:

"Hidden power is a very random move between each pokemon, and has a lot of potential in a pokemon battle. You may have already taught it to a pokemon and discovered that this seemingly normal-type move can land super effective hits on certain types, which isn't a trait of the normal type. You may see a low effect of power from the move in battle, or a heavy hit from it. What determines what this move does? What is this move anyway?

Well first, let's explain what you can get from this move. If you look at the move description in the game, it doesn't give a definite power, marks it as a normal type move, and says, "The attack power varies among pokemon." There's only one false statement within that move description, and that's the fact that it is a normal type move. In reality, this move can be any type BUT a normal type move. Personally, I think this move should be right along with Curse with the ???-type description. The attack power is going to be a number between 30 and 70, which causes the randomness in base power between pokemon.

"70? That's kinda low, don't you say?" If you compare it to other moves like Overheat with 140 base power, then yeah, it is kind of low since Hidden Power has only the potential to amount to half of the power Overheat has. But once again, it still has a lot of potential to help. Say you have a Registeel, a steel type pokemon. The best steel type move it can learn is Steel Claw, and that doesn't amount to much unless you use Curse a few times, and still Pokemon can overcome it. However, if you are able to get the right Individual Values, Hidden Power suddenly becomes a better choice for a move if you can get it to be Steel type, and have 70 base power at the same time. (Individual Values are going to be explained within the weekend.) Another scenario could be for Ninetales, a fire pokemon. It has a good potential to be a Special Sweeper, but it can only learn a single type of move that's associated with the Special Attack stat, which is Fire type. If you give it a Hidden Power that can make use of Special Attack, it can get even deadlier for many different types.

So how do you go about finding the power and attack type of this move? Well let's start with the easier part ¬Ė the type. You can find the type out by battling different types of pokemon and going through a process of elimination, like if the Ninetales mentioned before used hidden power on Nosepass and it was super effective, then you could assume that it's either ground, rock, water, or grass type and go from there. Or you could do it the other way through algebra, which needs a basic knowledge of mathematics to figure out, and an IV value for all six stats. The equation to find the base power is this:

HP Type = (T1 + T2 + T3 +T4 + T5 + T6) * 15 / 63

Please note that the * means "multiply by" and the / means to "divide by". Anyway, you're probably wondering what the T1's all mean, so I should explain those now. Those are variables, or things that can mean an infinite number of values unless defined. We can't make use of the equation unless we define them, so let's make use of the IV values now. The values basically go like this:


If IV of Hit Points is odd, then T1 = 1.
If IV of Attack is odd, then T2 = 2.
If IV of Defense is odd, then T3 = 4.
If IV of Speed is odd, then T4 = 8.
If IV of Special Attack is odd, then T5 = 16.
If IV of Special Defense is odd, then T6 = 32.

If by chance you happen to get a number that is not odd or divisible by two, then that particular variable will be equal to zero. Now say the Ninetales from before had these IVs:

HP = 31
Attack = 31
Defense = 30
Speed = 31
Sp. Attack = 30
Sp. Defense = 31

Yeah, I know that they're kinda high, but this is just for example purposes. After we use these IV's to make some sense with our current information, we come up with this:

HP Type = (1 + 2 + 0 + 8 + 0 + 32) * 15 / 63
HP Type = (43) * 15 / 63
HP Type = 645 / 63
HP Type = ~10

If you don't know, the ~ sign in algebra means "about". It's what gets put in front of a value with un-needed decimals, and we can't use a number with decimals for the equation. If you want to know the decimal that we got, it was about 10.2. If it was 10.5 or above, the value would turn out to be ~11 instead. Anyway, we got 10 for the HP type, but that isn't a type. We have to input the number into a table to get the type.

Here's the table:
If HP Type = 0, then the type is Fighting.
If HP Type = 1, then the type is Flying.
If HP Type = 2, then the type is Poison.
If HP Type = 3, then the type is Ground.
If HP Type = 4, then the type is Rock.
If HP Type = 5, then the type is Bug.
If HP Type = 6, then the type is Ghost.
If HP Type = 7, then the type is Steel.
If HP Type = 8, then the type is Fire.
If HP Type = 9, then the type is Water.
If HP Type = 10, then the type is Grass.
If HP Type = 11, then the type is Electric
If HP Type = 12, then the type is Psychic.
If HP Type = 13, then the type is Ice.
If HP Type = 14, then the type is Dragon.
If HP Type = 15, then the type is Dark.

So now we can see why it was super effective against the Nosepass now, because it was the Grass type. But now we need to calculate one more thing that is equally important ¬Ė power. That's obtained generally the same way as the type is, with a different equation of course. Here it is:

HP Power = (P1 + P2 + P3 + P4 + P5 + P6) * 40 / 63 + 30

So yeah, now we have a bunch of variables again. Here are the values:

If IV of Hit Points divided by 4 has a remainder of 2 or 3, then P1 = 1.
If IV of Attack divided by 4 has a remainder of 2 or 3, then P2 = 2.
If IV of Defense divided by 4 has the remainder of 2 or 3, then P3 = 4.
If IV of Speed divided by 4 has the remainder of 2 or 3, then P4 = 8.
If IV of Special Attack divided by 4 has the remainder of 2 or 3, then P5 = 16.
If IV of Special Defense divided by 4 has the remainder of 2 or 3, then P6 = 32.

Understand that? Probably not. Luckily, there's only 31 different values that can appear for IV's so we can limit the possibilities down to a few values. These values are the ones that will always work: 2, 3, 6, 7, 10, 11, 14, 15, 18, 19, 22, 23, 26, 27, 30, and 31. So since both of the two values we use match to some of the values that will work, we can solve the equation now:

HP Power = (1 + 2 + 4 + 8 + 16 + 32) * 40 / 63 + 30
HP Power = (63) * 40 / 63 + 30
HP Power = 40 + 30
HP Power = 70

If you're wondering how I went from step 2 to step 3 like that, it's because I saw that both sides of the division sign had 63 on them, so I realized that it would make it easier for me to do if I just removed the two values altogether since I would end up with the same answer anyway.

And guess what? There's no fancy table we have to look through for the Base Power of Hidden Power because we've already gotten a value from the equation ¬Ė 70. So this Ninetales with HP Grass is actually a very good pokemon, no doubt about that since it covers four of its weaknesses."

http://serebii.net/games/...er.shtml

This is the link to the Hidden Power Guide.

EV's:

EV's, also known as Effort Values, again I use a guide from Serebii on EV's, enjoy:

"As you may or may not know, EV's are a very important part of training any pokemon. Just starting to be recognized by people other than breeders, EV training helps pokemon become more adept in a certain area. They can be used to give any pokemon the edge in a battle, or keep a pokemon in one. For example, if you wanted to give a Raikou a boost in its Speed, you would simply train it against pokemon that's speed stat is dominant. Another example is if someone wanted to help Tyranitar land a bigger hit with Crunch, which would have that person battle against pokemon that are more dominant in Special Attack.

With that in mind, let's start with the basics. If you're wondering what "EV" means, it simply means "Effort Value." It makes sense since you need to put your effort into battling certain pokemon in order to get rewarded for your efforts. Effort Values are hidden values, so you can't just look somewhere in the pokemon's statistics to figure out how many Effort Values you have already earned for a certain stat. Because of this limit, calculating Effort Values requires you to record each pokemon, or at least the EVs gained from the pokemon. If you want an easy way to do this, just make a chart with six columns, label them according to the six different stats, and place a tally for each point gained in the stat.

So now you're in a battle. Keep in mind that only battles where EXP counts gives you an Effort Point, so no battling over a link cable or battle tower to get Effort Points. Anyway, you have a Linoone, and you just defeated a Zubat. Now, just like a pokemon's Base Values are set in stone (like Slaking always having a base value of 160 in Attack), EVs are the same way. Anyone who's ever trained a Zubat knows that the dominant stat is Speed, so if you look at the Speed EV chart, you will see that Zubat gives 1 EV to Speed. Most of the time, it's this easy. But sometimes you will find that a pokemon gives EVs in an odd stat, like Charizard giving 3 EVs to Special Attack or that a pokemon gives EVs to more than one stat, like Venusaur giving 2 EVs to Special attack and 1 EV to Special Defense. Just watch out for those things. If you can't find the EV, just use the pokedex to find it.

Now to explain how these work. Say the Linoone battled 4 Zubats and aquired 4 EVs in the pokemon's Speed EV. When it levels up, it will gain one more point to its Speed stat than if it had battled three Zubats and one Geodude (1 EV to Defense). This is because for every 4 Effort Points you get towards a certain stat, you get one point more to the stat. If you wish for a less technical explanation, let's call each Effort Value a Piece of Heart, like in any Legend of Zelda game. If you get four Pieces of Heart, you get a Heart Container. It's the same way with Effort Values. Of course, there has to be a limit to this, seeing as if you battled 3,996 Zubats, you would have a lot of time on your hands, and a Linoone with 999 located in its Speed stat.

So, what are the limits? Well for starters, you can only gain 510 Effort Values before they will stop being counted. 510 can be called our "Overall Maximum", if you want a technical term. So this brings the Effort Points you can gain to 64, once again as a maximum. But this is still a bit much to add to any one stat, and it would make any Mewtwo have an absurd amount of Special Attack still, or Blissey still having that huge potential to go over 700 Hit Points (not like you still can't get there.) So, to make it limited still, there can only be a maximum of 255 Effort Points per stat, giving a pokemon a potential 32 point increase in any stat.

So now, in terms of pokemon you have to battle, let's say you want that Linoone to get its maximum speed. You would have to battle 255 Zubats to get to the maximum speed value; EV training for any more Speed will become useless if you choose to continue after 255. Now, I can imagine some of you thinking, "Wow, I don't want to battle 255 pokemon to fill up on Speed EVs." Well the good news is that you don't. The maximum points you can get for any selected stat is 255, right? That's exactly what it is, a maximum. There are a bunch of ways to lessen the EV training and make it less daunting.

Let's start with the simplest. Remember all those Proteins at the Energy Guru that cost 9800 pokèdollars a piece? Those give 10 Effort Points to any pokemon's attack stat. HP UP, Calcium, Iron, Carbos, and Zinc are similar of course, giving 10 Effort Points to their corresponding stat. But once again, this would make it too easy to EV train and will result in a limit. The reason that those extra proteins that couldn't be used on your ultra-tough Blaziken wouldn't work could be one of two reasons: 1. The stat is already maxed out on EV points, or 2. You already used ten proteins on the Blaziken. Since you can only use 10 vitamins on a single stat, this gives you 100 Effort Values possible to each stat this way. If you're one who is looking for a rounded way of giving Effort Points to a pokemon and carries a lot of money around, you could easily buy 10 Proteins, 10 Irons, 10 Calciums, 10 Zincs, 10 Carbos's, and a single HP UP and you will have already maxed out your Effort Values this way.

There's two more ways to make the whole EV training process go faster. Remember the Macho Brace from that house north of Mauville City? That brace will double Effort Points gained. Suddenly you earn 2 Effort Points for each Zubat wearing the brace. Have you heard about the elusive Pokerus? That does the exact same thing as the Macho brace. So now you have a Ninetales carrying a Macho Brace with the Pokerus, and you just defeated a Spinda. Since Spinda gives out 1 Effort Point to Special Attack, and you have both the Pokerus and Macho brace, you get 4 Effort Points points to Special Attack, which results in you gaining one more point to Special Attack on your next level-up. Suddenly that 255 becomes 64 pokemon that you have to battle to fill the Effort points up. Of course, the Pokerus doesn't appear that easily, so good luck trying to get it.

As for recommended places to train in R/S, try these:

HP - Whismur - Cave on Route 106
Attack - Carvanha - Route 119 (Super Rod)
Defense - Sandshrew/Skarmory - Route 113
Special Attack - Spinda - Route 113
Special Defense - Tentacool - Almost Anywhere you can surf
Speed - Zubat/Golbat - Cave of Origin

If you want to know if your pokemon can earn more Effort Points, there's a woman in Slateport's outdoor sales area that will give you a ribbon if you have aquired 510 Effort Points, figuratively called the "Effort Ribbon."

So logically, it's best to start EV training immediately after you get the pokemon. But of course, you can't get any Effort Points from those pokemon like Carvanha with your newly hatched Mudkip (well you can but it'd be hard). This is where the EXP. Share comes in. Any experience you get through the EXP. Share is divided in half, so you'd think it would be the same for Effort Values right? Actually, you get the same amount of Effort Values for the battle as the pokemon fighting it did. So if your Mudkip had EXP. Share attatched to it and your Blaziken defeated a Carvanha, both would get 1 EV point, if they could. Sadly, you cannot manipulate the Macho Brace or Pokerus to give Mudkip 4 EVs in place of 1 by using the EXP. Share. However, if you were to send out Mudkip first with Macho Brace and Pokerus and switch, it would gain the four Effort Points.

One last thing on EVs - Rare Candys. The so-thought dreaded item that doesn't boost your stats as high as if you took the time to level up. They usually accumulate in someone's box or are sold. Rare Candies, in reality, do not take EVs into account when the stats increase. They're still there, they just haven't been applied to the pokemon's stats yet. It's safe to use them after the Effort Points are full."

And the link to the EV Guide, note that this also contains what Pokemon give EV's in each stat.

IV's:

IV's are also called Individual Values, they are covered here:

"There's a lot of things that influence what stats you get when you finally overcome the odds and receive a pokemon at level 100. Say you have a Salamence, and you decide to battle someone else's level 100 Salamence. Your Salamence uses Dragon Claw and takes half of the opponents HP away. In return, the other Salamence uses Dragon Claw as well and takes all of your Salamence's HP away. "What gives? Shouldn't the attacks do the same amount of damage?" Well, no. More than likely, the Salamence that got knocked out probably had lower HP and Special Defense than usual, along with Special Attack. This is influenced by a lot of values, but in particular, Individual Values.

Individual Values have the most influence on any stat of any pokemon. It's what makes every single pokemon unique and have different stats. Say we have the mega-defensive bug type, Shuckle, and it's EV trained in both defense and special defense and it's at level 100, and a neutral nature. If we look at the base stats for this pokemon's defense and special defense, they both say 230, so you'd figure there wouldn't be much of a difference, right? Well, in reality, there can be a pretty wide difference. At level 100, this Shuckle has a defense stat that is 466, and a Special Defense stat equaling 542. Quite a wide difference there, about 80 points separated. A person using this Shuckle had better watch out for attack based moves if they are relying on defense.

As for technical information pertaining to Individual Values, the equation for it will ¬Ėusually- give a number between 0 and 31. Keep in mind that the equation's we have to the IV's are not the same as in the game, but they are extremely close. With these equations, it's best to calculate it closest to level 50 as possible for accurate results. If you're looking to calculate a pokemon's IVs that you have trained, then hopefully you know the Effort Points it gained. If you don't then the math will be completely inaccurate if you just stick the stats in the equation. If you don't already know, Hidden Power is calculated completely on IV's.

Now that I've showed how much they can affect stats, let's grab the equation for determining a pokemon's Individual Value. Keep in mind that this is NOT for Hit Points. That has its own equation.

IV = ((Math.Ceiling(Stat / Personality Value) - 5) * 100 / Level Value ) - 2 * Base Stat ¬Ė Effort Points / 4

¬ÖAnd you probably don't know what Math.Ceiling means either. It's basically a term used when you want something rounded up, like to the Ceiling. If it was rounding down, like to a floor, it would be Math.Floor. Simple right? There's also a flaw in this equation, as it counts all of the Effort points, not the ones that have been added to the stat which is what we want outta there, so this equation is a little more accurate.

IV = ((Math.Ceiling(Stat / Personality Value) - 5) * 100 / Level Value) - 2 * Base Stat ¬Ė Math.Floor(Effort Points / 4)

As for the HP Individual Value equation, here it is without edit:

Hit Point IV = (( Stat - Level - 10 ) * 100/Level ) - 2 * BaseStat - EV/4

Of course, we face the same problem as the other equation, so here's the edited version:

Hit Point IV = ((Stat ¬Ė Level Value - 10) * 100 / Level Value ) - 2 * BaseStat ¬Ė Math.Floor(EV / 4)

As you can see there's a lot of things you need in order to do these equations to get the Individual Value that this returns to you. The most important thing you need is the stat, apparently. The second thing you need is the Personality Value, which is basically what effect the personality has towards your stats. Now because we know that Natures can give a +10% increase towards a stat, or a -10% decrease towards a stat, we need to convert that to an actual number so that it can work in the equation.

If the Nature gives a +10% increase to a stat, then the Personality Value = 1.1
If the Nature doesn't have an effect towards the stat, then the Personality Value = 1
If the Nature gives a -10% decrease to a stat, then the Personality Value = 0.9

I'll explain Personality Values more in the DV guide. Another thing you need for the equation is the Base Stats of the pokemon, which you can find in the Pokedex right above the Max Stats at the bottom. The last thing you need are the Effort Points gained from battle, which are explained in another guide. Effort Points are equal to zero if you never battled with it yet, or used rare candies to level up, or even used the daycare to level up. Anyway, suppose I went through Colosseum twice and caught two Forretress. Let's find all we can about the information we need about them so we can determine the IVs.

Forretress 1
Level 43, Mild Nature
Hit Points: 121
Attack: 94
Defense: 114
Sp. Attack: 72
Sp. Defense: 57
Speed: 41
No EV's gained

Forretress 2
Level 43, Relaxed Nature
Hit Points: 130
Attack: 88
Defense: 143
Sp. Attack: 60
Sp. Defense: 62
Speed: 45
No EV's gained

Forretress's Base stats 'Base Stats
Hit Points: 75
Attack: 90
Defense: 140
Sp. Attack: 60
Sp. Defense: 60
Speed:40

Seems like a lot of information, doesn't it? Well I can't argue with you there, but that's everything we need to do the equations out now. Let's use this information to find the IV of Attack of Forretress 1 first:

IV = ((Math.Ceiling(Stat / Personality Value) - 5) * 100 / Level Value) - 2 * Base Stat ¬Ė Math.Floor(Effort Points / 4)
IV = ((Math.Ceiling(94 / 1) ¬Ė 5) * 100/43) ¬Ė 2 * 90 ¬Ė Math.Floor(0/4)
IV = ((89) * 100 / 43) ¬Ė 180
IV = (8900 / 43) ¬Ė 180
IV = ~207 ¬Ė 180
IV = ~27

27, eh? That's actually almost close to the best it can be. Let's see how Forretress 2 does for the same test:

IV = ((Math.Ceiling(Stat / Personality Value) - 5) * 100 / Level Value) - 2 * Base Stat ¬Ė Math.Floor(Effort Points / 4)
IV = ((Math.Ceiling(88 / 1) ¬Ė 5) * 100 / 43) ¬Ė 2 * 90 ¬Ė Math.Floor(0 / 4)
IV = ((83) * 100 / 43) ¬Ė 180
IV = (8300 / 43) ¬Ė 180
IV = ~193 ¬Ė 180
IV = ~13

Wondering what the ~ is meaning? It's algebra for "about". As I stated before, these formulas will not be as accurate as the real things, but they are pretty darn close. At level 5 these equations won't be very accurate at all, so it's best to level up to at least 25 I recommend. Anyway, you get the idea for the main 5 stats, so let's just do the Hit Points one now cause I'm lazy. :P

Forretress 1:
Hit Point IV = ((Stat ¬Ė Level Value - 10) * 100 / Level Value ) - 2 * BaseStat ¬Ė Math.Floor(EV / 4)
Hit Point IV = ((121 ¬Ė 43 ¬Ė 10) * 100 / 43) ¬Ė 2 * 75 ¬Ė Math.Floor(0 / 4)
Hit Point IV = ((78) * 100 / 43) ¬Ė 150
Hit Point IV = (7800 / 43) ¬Ė 150
Hit Point IV = ~181 ¬Ė 150
Hit Point IV = ~31

Wait, wait! It's 31, so that mean's it's perfect, right? Well in this case¬Ö no. It's not. If you look at Forretress 2's HP, it's 130, which is 9 points higher than this Forretress. It's a perfect example of when these equations can be inaccurate. The best thing you could do at this point is level it up further to get a bigger difference in the stats.

So how can I influence IV's? Well since IVs are given to a pokemon upon meeting, the best thing you can do is just receive a pokemon with high IV's. This means doing one of two things, or both. Catching pokemon a large amount of the same species of pokemon is an okay way, but you'll need a large stock of pokeballs and catching pokemon from the wild usually results with average/lower than average IVs. The second way to obtain IVs is breeding. Pokemon that are bred usually result with normal/higher than normal IVs. This is not true for every single pokemon however, as you can still get low IVs with breeded pokemon and uber IVs with wild pokemon. There really isn't much you can do to get good IVs except for persistent effort to get good IVs, just make sure you have the patience for it."

And the link for the IV Guide: http://serebii.net/games/ivs.shtml

DV's:

DV's are pretty hard to explain. Again Serebii credit goes to this:

"Dynamic Values are everything that can change within a pokemon’s stats to make it different from the next. They range from the pokemon’s current Level, to the nature it has, to all the hidden stats. To get an extremely good pokemon, you have to utilize almost every single DV there is. It’s hard to do so though, since most of them depend on luck of getting the right random value. Anyway, I’ll explain each Dynamic Value separately.

The Level

This is the easy part. If you want to change your pokemon’s level, just gain the required amount of experience needed. Now you may already know this, but every pokemon has a set amount of experience it needs before it gets to level 100, six different experience amounts in all ranging from 600,000 experience to 1,640,000 experience. Simple concept, no?

Nature Values

If you’ve looked at the nature table on the site, you can see that each nature is either neutral or helping a stat and downing another stat. There’s a set amount for these values too. Nature values will either equal 1 where they don’t do anything to a stat, 1.1 where they increase a stat by 10%, or 0.9 where they decrease a stat by 10%. If you’re the person that always uses the neutral natures, think for a second. If you use a special sweeper with a neutral nature, you are completely ignoring the Attack stat anyway so why not take 10% from that and add 10% to Special Attack? (Modest nature btw.)

Of course if you want to influence it though, you will just have to go through a major breeding spree as there is no way to influence what nature you get really. On legendaries, you just have to catch em repeatedly, and for [email protected], you are stuck with whatever nature you get with it when you first catch it anyway since those values are made at the beginning of the game when you first start, unless you have the Eon ticket of course.

Gender Values

This really isn’t that important in training a pokemon, but it is a Dynamic Value none the less. Basically what it does is determine if your pokemon is female, male, or a Mirage Island Pokemon. A Gender Value of 0 means it’s a mirage Island Pokemon, a value between 1 and 127 mean that it is male, and 128 to 256 mean it is female. Now before you take that Metagross of yours to the guy that can see Mirage Island sometimes, note that genderless pokemon have Gender values as well.

Effort Values

Effort Values are very dynamic, and it’s something you can influence very well. If you wish to give that special sweeper a higher boost in Special attack and Speed, it’s recommended that you EV Train. Of course there’s already a guide on this site on how to do that. :P

Individual Values

Individual Values are what make same-species pokemon different. They add a bonus of 0 to 31 to your pokemon’s stats, and they are set in stone once you catch it. And wouldn’t you know it, there’s a guide for this too!"

And the guide for this: http://serebii.net/games/dvs.shtml

PokeRus:

My favorite thing in the game, next to Espeon that is. Anyway, PokeRus is pretty rare and is covered:

"The Pok√©rus is a useful little virus that can help you while you train your beloved Pok√©mon. You may or may not have heard of it, but chances are that you haven¬ít heard of it if you are reading this. You may be wondering ¬ďWhy do I need it¬Ē or ¬ďHow can a virus help my Pok√©mon¬Ē or ¬ďHow do I get this ¬ĎPok√©rus¬í¬Ē or ¬ďWhy is this guy asking so many questions¬Ē. Save for the last one, it will be covered here.

Let’s start with what it does. The Pokérus is, as mentioned before, very helpful in training your own Pokémon. If you have the Pokérus on a Pokémon, you have probably noticed that it will spread to the other Pokémon in your party and when you level one of those Pokémon up by battling, their stats will increase higher than usual. The reason for this is because the Pokérus doubles the Effort Points you’ve obtained. In other words, it’s just like the Macho Brace you get north of Mauville except without the speed boost and it doesn’t take up an item slot. (For more info on Effort Points, go take a look at the Effort Value guide.) It’s quite helpful indeed. It’s important to note that the Pokémon with the Pokérus will lose the Pokérus eventually, and a small dot will appear in your Pokémon’s status screens. If you want to keep the Pokérus forever, make sure you put an infected Pokémon in your box.

So now how do I get this elusive virus? Well to tell you the truth… It’s really based upon luck, like most things. Maybe not as much as to get a shiny Pokémon, but around that area. To get the Pokérus, your Pokémon needs to engage in a battle a wild Pokémon that holds the Pokérus. You will be alerted if you have the Pokérus in your party when you next visit the Pokémon center. The Pokémon nurse there will go through a dialogue with you dealing with the Pokérus after you get them healed. You can catch it as well by catching the Pokémon and placing it in your party to spread it.

And that is amazingly everything related to the Pokérus…"

And the link: http://serebii.net/games/pokerus.shtml

Now, natures:

"Something new to the game mechanics of Pokemon in the third generation compared to the last two is the addition of Nature Values, or just simply Natures. Choosing the right nature is important for your pokemon, as it can give you a definitive edge in battle. Along with that, it can also hamper your chances to win if used incorrectly. This guide points out how to use Nature Values effectively.

First off, let me explain how nature values affect pokemon. In the game mechanics of today, a nature value will always give a 10% increase in one stat and a 10% decrease in another stat. If you know of the neutral natures that give no bonus whatsoever, its because one stat is having a 10% increase and a 10% decrease in the same stat. They cancel each other out basically. Natures will give potential bonuses to every stat except for Hit Points.

So, the first thing to do when going for a nature for your pokemon is to have a moveset in mind. If you're going for a special sweeper, you might as well choose something that's going to increase your special attack. Along with that though, you're going to have to decrease one of your other stats. However, if you're not using any attacks that use the Attack stat, then you might as well choose the nature to decrease that stat (which is Modest, btw).

Below are all the natures and what states they raise. The berries stop confusion when used on Pokémon of the certain nature"

Since I can't exactly post it, your going to have to go the the link below to find the nature benefits.

The link: http://www.serebii.net/game...es.shtml

Lastly, the FAQ:

Q: How do I know what my EV's are?
A: Read the guide...

Q: What game should I get?
A: What's the best game series?

Q: IV's?
A: It's in the guide....

Q: What does "DV" stand for?
A: Dynamic Values

Q: Rate my team!
A: This is the Team Rating thread, make a topic

Q: Are there other things I could learn about?
A: Serebii has a lot of crap, here: http://serebii.net/games/mechanics.shtml

That pretty much covers it. Anything else regarding questions, dont be afraid to ask in this thread, I will add it.

Credit to Serebii's "Dragonair" for writing these guides. I give Serebii FULL credit, so don't say I stole ANY of it.

This topic will be Pinned, left open for disscussion, Suggestions can be posted here, Questions regarding anything Pokemon related may also be asked here.

Thank you,
EspeonDude_

--Pinned--

« Last edited by EspeonDude_ on May 4th 2007 »


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Jirachi X Posted at: 23:25 Nov20 2006 Post ID: 1159153
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Yay, something has been posted that I was too lazy to do XD

Yeah, I would of done this but... read the above sentance.
I'm gone - bye
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imaloony8.0 Posted at: 05:17 Dec11 2006 Post ID: 1208105
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Something's been bothering me...

Which Natures add and subtract skill points?

Wanna listen to me rant about stuff? I started a blog!
https://theloonybinblog.wordpress.com/
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MasterMilotic Posted at: 16:59 Dec11 2006 Post ID: 1208987
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All of them except five. http://www.serebii.net/games/natures.shtml
The complete list is in that link.
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EspeonDude_ Posted at: 20:19 Dec12 2006 Post ID: 1211536
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Thanks MasterMilotic. I think I should add Natures to the guide also, so I'll add this.


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cyber_john3000 Posted at: 14:53 Dec13 2006 Post ID: 1212400
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ed, i don't know how to calculate hidden power!! could explain it in more easier way. thank you, you could e-mail if you like.

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EspeonDude_ Posted at: 14:55 Dec13 2006 Post ID: 1212406
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Ok, thanks for suggesting that. I've put up an easier way to get Hidden Power.


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v-gamer Posted at: 22:16 Mar10 2007 Post ID: 1428751
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Hm... I've done the caculation for the current Hidden Power type my Dragonite knows, but something doesn't make sense. When I battle a Kecleon, it says that Kecleon has turned to a Psychic type. But now that I've done the formula for finding out Hidden Power's type, it comes out to be about 5, which is a Bug type. This is my Dragonite's stats, so maybe I'm doing something wrong?

HP: 297
ATK: 297
DEF: 196
SPD: 172
SP.ATK: 189
SP.DEF: 236

I find out it's:
HP Type= 1 + 2 + 0 + 0 + 16 + 0 *15/63
HP Type= 19*15/63
HP Type= 285/63
HP Type= 4.5238...
HP Type= ~ 5

So yeah, maybe I've done something wrong? Or, maybe the formula and/or table is wrong. I don't know...
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EspeonDude_ Posted at: 16:31 Mar13 2007 Post ID: 1433719
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Did you do the IV's?


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v-gamer Posted at: 19:33 Mar13 2007 Post ID: 1434078
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Heh... Guess not. >.<
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Thank you, Vasco <3
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Zelda Fan Posted at: 18:30 Mar30 2007 Post ID: 1475336
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Posts deleted, enough said.

gotta love brizilian jiu jutsu!!
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Simple Theory Posted at: 12:14 Apr11 2007 Post ID: 1509675
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I think the title of this topic should be edited to either game mechanics or in-game mechanics, or something to that effect.
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EspeonDude_ Posted at: 16:17 Apr12 2007 Post ID: 1514697
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Got it changed then. Thanks for pointing that out.


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Fwank Posted at: 05:46 Apr30 2007 Post ID: 1568611
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ATTN ESPEON:

UPDATE THIS WITH BASIC BATTLING MECHANICS

it's in caps because it's important
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Simple Theory Posted at: 19:23 May03 2007 Post ID: 1575894
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Err.. Topic kind of contradicts itself.

Basic Battling Mechanics. Read if you want to learn advanced tactics.
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Fwank Posted at: 00:35 May04 2007 Post ID: 1576428
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no, it's just that i've recentli come to realise the basic part (STAB/typing) isn't there, i tell people come to read this, they do and get confused about IV's and EV's...

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EspeonDude_ Posted at: 20:56 May04 2007 Post ID: 1577502
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Err. Oh. What the hell was I going to say?


F√ľck.

Changed.


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Husky Boy Posted at: 05:05 May21 2007 Post ID: 1609119
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ED_, found a way to determin the Gender Value?

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Fwank Posted at: 11:52 May21 2007 Post ID: 1609553
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it's a hidden value like EV, you can't determine it

*edit: aside from the obvious "if gender value > X then poke = male and < X then poke = female", but knowing the value of X wouldn't help if you don't know how to determine GV, and also; why are we trying to find out gender value? for mirage island? the gender value for the old man is also random, so purpose defeated

« Last edited by Fwank on May 21st 2007 »
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LoveMyNidoking Posted at: 11:59 May27 2007 Post ID: 1621851
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Well Espeon did a great job. And I was wondering how the heck do you get your stats, blah blah blah... : doh :
~Training a Nidoking with all these Mewtwos out there is either being brave or idiot...~

Muahahahahaahhahahahahahahahahhaahhahahhahahah...
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